Episode 6. Bubbles Colliding: What Do You Mean by That?

A conversation with Tania Israel, psychologist, professor, and social justice advocate, on dialoguing with people across political lines

Do you find yourself afraid or angry when you think about the divide on our political and cultural landscape? Do you wish you could engage with people on the "other side" but find those conversations turning into visceral arguments that just make that gap seem wider? Do you find yourself avoiding conversations with and maybe even drifting away from loved ones and friends on that "other side"? Do you think that, maybe, figuring out how to bridge these divides might be really important?

Tania Israel has done a lot of thinking and study on how to engage with and find common ground with people who hold beliefs that may differ vastly from our own. And as her offering to the needs of the time, she's giving workshops on doing just that - "Going Beyond the Bubble: How to Have a Dialogue across the Political Lines." In this conversation, her thoughts on the importance of curiosity and listening, embracing the diversity in the range of values in this country, how we can all stand up for the most vulnerable, and how all that might just be how we can save democracy. 

"There are things that we can do, and none of them are ever going to be enough. And somehow, we have to do them anyway … We need all of it. I feel like right now in this country, everybody needs to bring whatever they have."

—Tania Israel

 

Links and extras from "Bubbles Colliding: What Do You Mean by That?" 

A conversation with Tania Israel on Dialoguing across Political Lines - KCSB show July 9, 2017

Preview this episode!

**PARTICIPATEWe the Village wants to know - What do you think? Are conversations (as opposed to bitter arguments) with those whose beliefs seem very far from ours a part of saving our democracy? Have you had an experience with having this kind of dialogue? A breakthrough? A botched attempt maybe? Have you been wanting to have such a conversation but haven't yet? Check out Tania Israel's dialogue flowchart. Apply its guidance. Take perspectives. Come from a place of curiosity. Report back.Send a message, subject line, "Bubbles Colliding" or record a voice memo and email it to: wethevillagestories@gmail.com. Maybe we'll play it on a future show!

On Tania Israel's website, you can learn about her work, contact her to schedule a seminar on dialoguing across political lines for your group, get a brief overview with the dialogue flowchart, and more.

And check out her TedxTalk, Bisexuality and Beyond.

Want to hear from some super real conversations across political lines? Check out "Lea in Trumpland". The link will take you to the first of a series of conversations in which Strangers (a really awesome podcast) host Lea Thau goes on the road to converse with Trump voters in the deeply intimate, open way that characterizes her show. 

Here's an article that talks about the different ways we have of knowing what is fact: "Anger, Resentment and Apple Pie: Understanding the Fourth of July in the Trump Era" by Judah Grunstein (World Politics Review, July 5, 2017)

Listen to George Lakoff on "Idea Framing, Metaphors, and Your Brain."

Here's the NYT review of Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance.

And the Times review on Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right by Arlie Hochschild.

Suggested listening (aka songs from the radio show version):

♪ "Your Racist Friend" by They Might Be Giants on Flood, Skyline Studios, 1990

♪ "So Many People in the Neighborhood" by Ween on Quebec, Sanctuary Records, 2003

♪ "Imagine” cover by Alex G. with Gustavo Guerrera on My Life on the Internet, 2017

SUGGESTED PODCAST:

Strangers by Lea Thau.

SUGGESTED READING:

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah. Here's the Times review on Born a Crime. If you can, listen to an audio version read by Trevor Noah!

Episode 5. Women in a Boat: Team Sistership

What do we gain when people defy what society and tradition claim they should be and do? Where would we be today if women of the past hadn’t dared ignore the boundaries of the “norm”? How would things evolve if we embraced wherever we’re at—including aging—with boldness? What do you think about if you’re on a boat in the middle of the ocean in the middle of nowhere?

Hear from the captain and crew of Sistership 2017 (all women, over fifty). Sistership 2017 is the second edition of the first-all women’s team to undertake the Race to Alaska (R2AK), a gnarly, 750-mile, people- or wind-powered boat race from Port Townsend, Washington, to Ketchikan, Alaska, over open ocean; through shipping lanes and then remote, difficult-to-access waters; with the possibility of treacherous conditions and some amazing wildlife and scenery. The start gun will fire at 5 am on Thursday, June 8, 2017. Sistership hails from Ventura, California, and their journey is a message—women and girls, you can do anything; be proud of your accomplishments; and delight in growing older, as each stage you’re in can be a marvelous stage of life.

Credit: Photo from Sistership website.

Credit: Photo from Sistership website.

“That sense of adventure - when you do something like that and you put yourself out there, you challenge yourself. There’s nothing like feeling that alive. You start to realize, especially in your fifties, that you don’t get too many of those opportunities. If we can still do this at this age, why wouldn’t we?”

—Johanna Gabbard

CREDITS: Alanna Leavy composed and performed the intro and closing music. Also in this episode "Triumphant" and "To the Sea" by Alanna Leavy. The remainder of the sound was recorded during the Sistership 2016 voyage, including their songs “We are Sistership (Just to Show the World We Can)” and a shanty song I'm calling “Row, Row, Row, to Alaska”. Our guests today were Captain Michelle Boroski, Johanna Gabbard, and Stephanie “Scout” Mahue. The three plus Stephanie York are Sistership 2017. Michelle and Joanna, along with Janice Mason and Sherry Smith comprised Sistership 2016.The show was recorded in part in the studios of KCSB (the interview was recorded in Johanna's car). Thank you to all of the inspiring women in my life and in the world. Thank you to everyone everywhere who’s been told an aspiration can’t be met because that’s "the way it is" and does it anyway and to those who have paved and continue to pave the way for a more equitable future.

Links and extras from Ep 5. Women in a Boat: Team Sistership

**PARTICIPATEWe the Village wants to know - When did you defy norms and expectations of society and tradition? Who or what inspired you to believe you could accomplish something you or others may have thought impossible? What's your Sistership moment? Send a message, subject line "My Sistership Moment" or record a voice memo and email it to: wethevillagestories@gmail.com

Check out Team Sistership! Here are some great videos of their songs and more: Sistership Sea Shanty, Just to Show the World We Can, Women Powered, and Finding Wind. Not enough? There's more. YouTube has tons on Sistership R2AK.

Learn more about the Race to Alaska (R2AK). It's gnarly. It's beautiful. And the 2017 race will start June 8, 2017.

Do you Know Your IX? Title IX is a 1972 Department of Education Act that protects against sex discrimination in educational institutions. Know your IX guides you in ensuring your institution is in compliance. Here's more IX info: Some history.

No you can't. Yes I can, Yes I can! Check out these stories about other women who've bravely defied societal and traditional norms and paved the future with possibilities for women and girls. From "Motor Girls" To "Kalamazoo Gals": A Celebration Of Women's History. Betsy Evans, coach - "Remembering a Time before Title IX" (The Journal News, May 24, 2017).

Read about the treacherous weather conditions during the Sistership's Newport-To-Ensenada training race (The Orange County Register, April 28, 2017).

 

SUGGESTED PODCAST:

"The Hour of Charm" - Episode 22 of The World According to Sound, an awesome podcast with 90-second episodes, tells the story of an all-women's orchestra in the '30s that entertained troops. Requirements to get in? Be in your twenties; have long, flowing hair; and weigh less than 120 pounds. Charming. 

SUGGESTED MUSIC (aka songs from the radio version):

♪ "Starlight in Daden" by Ekova on Heaven's Dust, Six Degrees Records, 1998. 

♪ "Evolve" by Ani DiFranco on Evolve, Righteous Babes Records, 2003.

♪ "Vinheta Quebranta” by Céu on Céu, Six Degrees Records, 2009.

♪ "Motherland” by Julia Jacklin on Don’t Let the Kids Win, Polyvinyl Records 2016

SUGGESTED READING:

Kalamazoo Gals: the Story of the Extraordinary Women (and a Few Men) Who Built Gibson's WWII “Banner” Guitars by John Thomas.

Motor Girls: How Women Took The Wheel And Drove Boldly Into The Twentieth Century y Sue Macy.

 

Episode 4. From the Sky - Answer to Our Ancestors Prayers, Part I

What lessons can we learn from the indigenous-led resistance at Standing Rock to the Dakota Access Pipeline? How can we ensure the stories those in power don’t want told are heard? If those stories aren’t shared and acknowledged and acted upon, is history bound to repeat itself? How can we all be water defenders and add our logs to the campfire that’s now burning? Hear from Myron Dewey of Digital Smoke Signals, whose coverage at Standing Rock brought live aerial footage to the world, showing human rights violations and desecration of tribal lands largely ignored in the media, along with 12-year-old Liliana Monge and her father, Roberto Monge, who traveled to the camp at Standing Rock from San Luis Obispo, California. With Marcus Lopez of KZAA lp, a newly forming independent radio station in Santa Barbara, California, that wants to help those stories get heard.

Credit: Photo from Myron Dewey's live stream of the conversation on which this episode is based

Credit: Photo from Myron Dewey's live stream of the conversation on which this episode is based

“This wasn’t checkers. It was chess. And we put one of the largest companies in the world in checkmate. Now there are water protectors all over the world. It’s their move next.”

—Myron Dewey, Digital Smoke Signals

Credits: Alanna Leavy composed and performed the intro and closing music. The remainder of the sound score was by a Chumash group from Santa Barbara and Ventura, California, as they marched and deconstructed the dome at the conclusion of UCSB’s Water Is Life: Standing with Standing Rock, a three-day event from May 18-20 honoring water protectors and indigenous-led leadership. Thank you for your inspiring music, especially that not shared here but just for those gathered under the Peace Tree, our eyes closed, the wind tickling our cheeks. Max Golding supplied the information on the Santa Barbara Standing Rock Coalition’s movement to ask the city to divest from institutions supporting pipelines. "From the Sky" was recorded in two sessions in the studios of KCSB. Guests were Myron Dewey of Digital Smoke Signals; 12-year-old Liliana Monge; and her father, Roberto Monge. Marcus Lopez was part of that conversation, which was a joint production of KCSB 91.9 FM and KZAA lp 96.5 FM, broadcasting from la Casa de la Raza in Santa Barbara, thanks to the astounding dedication of the KZAA workgroup and Elizabeth Robinson of No Alibis. Thank you to everyone everywhere who bears witness, shares truths, supports independent media, and keeps the fires burning.

Links and extras from Ep 4. From the Sky - Answers to Our Ancestors Prayers, I

**UPDATE: STANDING ROCK, ND—Men, women, and children gathered to peacefully resist referred to as "insurgents" by the group hired to police them? That group employing counterterrorism strategies against unarmed civilians? Terrifying. Read "Leaked Documents Reveal Counterterrorism Tactics Used at Standing Rock to 'Defeat Pipeline Insurgencies'" (The Intercept, May 27, 2017).

**PARTICIPATEWe the Village wants to know - when did you become a water protector? What log did you add or will you add to the campfire that's now burning? Send a message, subject line "My Standing Rock Fire Log" or record a voice memo and email it to: wethevillagestories@gmail.com

Check out more of the conversation with Myron Dewey of Digital Smoke Signals, Roberto and Liliana Monge, Marcus V. O. Lopez, and Holly Starley.

"Meet the Drone Operators of NoDAPL" - a YouTube video on the coverage out at Standing Rock using direct nonviolent drone action. And here's Digital Smoke Signal's Facebook page.

Divest! Ask your city or organization to create an SRI (socially responsible investment policy) and to divest from all institutions supporting Energy Transfer Partners and the Dakota Access Pipeline.

In Santa Barbara, CA: Here's a Q&A on Santa Barbara City's DAPL connections. And here are some actions you can take to support the city in honoring its resolution to stand with Standing Rock. Thank you, Santa Barbara Standing Rock Coalition and Max Golding. Check out Emiliano Campobello's address to SB City Council.

All across the United States: Tim Schwartz of Inspire Bank Exits is traveling around the country inspiring people to divest in institutions funding pipelines and recording their bank exists. Hit Tim up on Bank Exit's Twitter if you want him to record your exit. To find out more, here's Ernesto Burbank's interview of Tim Schwartz.

Check out Seattle leading the way - "2 Cities To Pull More Than $3 Billion From Wells Fargo Over Dakota Access Pipeline," NPR, Feb 8, 2017. 

Water is Life: Standing with Standing Rock - a three-day event at UCSB to honor water protectors and indigenous-centered leaders (May 18-20, 2017).

From Pachamama Alliance, here's the Prophecy of the Eagle and the Condor. And from Spirit Science, "Indigenous Leaders Share the Prophecy of the Condor and the Eagle," Sept 23, 2016. Here's some information on the Peace and Dignity runs.

"Clergy repudiate ‘doctrine of discovery’ as hundreds support indigenous rights at Standing Rock," Baptist News Global, Nov 4, 2016. Here's some history on the use of that awful doctrine - Five Hundred Years of Injustice by Steve Newcomb.

The people of Flint, Michigan, are still in crisis, trying to protect themselves and their water: "Terrified of Our Taps: Residents in Flint Still Live in Crisis," Newsy, May 22, 2017.

Keep up with Democracy Now's ongoing coverage of the Dakota Access Pipeline, including its first leak in early May.

Suggested listening:

Ed Lee Natay, Navajo Singer. Here's "Sacred Mask Dance" from that collection. 

♪ Mercedes Sosa, "voice of the voiceless ones," who gave voice to the songs of many Latin American songwriters. Here's "Gracias a la Vida."

Suggested reading:

Anything by Sherman Alexie. The audio version of Alexie reading The Absolutely True Diaries of a Part-Time Indian is wonderful.

This wasn’t checkers. It was chess. And we put one of the largest companies in the world in checkmate. Now there are water protectors are all over the world. It’s their move next.”

—Myron Dewey, Digital Smoke Signals

Episode 3. Please Release Me, Part II

Can privilege inhibit the capacity to empathize? Can we entrust billionaires to make policies that serve us all—that promote equity? With voices from the April 15, 2017, Tax March and a review of social psychologist Paul Piff’s experiments on how having lots transforms our actions, this is a conversation about how the wealthy play by different rules, what that might be costing US taxpayers given the new administration’s proclivities, and why that means we as a people have to fight every day for all of us to be heard and protected. Hear a few ideas on getting involved from Santa Barbara, California, marchers and speakers, Maricela Morales, Sean Tucker, and Cathy Murillo. And learn about SB 562, a bill that just might ensure health insurance for all—at least in California, to start.

“We have to fight literally every day, not just when we come together en mass…. Love does conquer fear. Let’s take love and integrity and honesty and compassion and bring this mo fo down.”

—Maricela Morales, CAUSE

Credits: Original music on this episode was composed and performed by Alanna Leavy. The clip of “Mentira” was by French-born Spanish singer Manu Chao on his album, Clandestino, which features songs he wrote while traveling through South America. The clip of “Please Release Me, Let Me Gogo” was by the Belgian-based Neon Judgement. Matthew Starley read the chapter titles. Santa Barbara Tax March protestors included Venice and Asher, Bernadette, Linda, Karen, Jennifer, and others. Speakers were Maricela Morales of CAUSE, Sean Tucker, and Santa Barbara City Councilwoman Cathy Murillo. Heather Brady got that Monopoly board to pose oh so opulently. James Salay pointed the Village host to the Monopoly experiments years back during a long philosophical discussion of money and its functioning in the world. “Please Release Me, Part II” was compiled and produced by Holly Starley. The episode was recorded, in part, in KJUC, KCSB’s AM studio. Thank you to everyone everywhere who stands up against injustice and oppression.

Links and extras from Ep 3. Please Release Me, Part II

Tax March

CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy)

Check out Paul Piff's TED Talk about his social psychology experiments using games like Monopoly and what they reveal about privilege, social behavior, and empathy.

Here's an analysis of those experiments by Michael Ricciardi for Planetsave.

Manu Chao's "Mentira" on his album Clandestino

♪ "Please Release Me, Let Me Gogo" by The Neon Judgement

Pod Save America, "a political podcast for people not yet ready to give up or go insane." Check out "When you pop the canister, snakes pop out," the April 17, 2017 episode, for some thoughts on how we know actions like calling Congress and going to Town Hall meetings are working.

The complete text of SB 562 - "The Healthy California Act"

Some news on and analysis of Senate Bill 562: "California Single Payer Bill SB 562 Clears First Hurdle" (National Nurses United, YubaNet, April 28, 2017); "California single-payer healthcare bill passes first committee test" (Los Angeles Times, April 26, 2017); "Universal Health Coverage in California Gets Closer" (Rocklin and Roseville Today, May 1, 2017); "California’s healthcare-for-all bill passes first committee" (Mercury News, updated May 6, 2017)

Weigh in on this bill or anything else: Contact CA Assemblywoman Monique Limón (click the yellow button on the right). Contact CA Senator Hannah Beth Jackson. Find your California representatives. Learn all about the California Senate.

Here's a link for more information if you want to join a citizens' advisory board in Santa Barbara to help shape local policy.   

On taxpayer costs to protect Trump and his family while they live and travel: "How much is Donald Trump’s travel and protection costing, anyway?" (The Washington Post, March 17, 2017); "Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Trips So Far May Have Cost Taxpayers Up To $10 Million" (Fortune, February 21, 2017); "Protecting Trump Tower cost NY City $24 million from election to inauguration" (Reuters, Feb 22, 2017)

New news on costs to protect the 45th since the recording of the podcast: "Trump's security costs for one day in NYC equivalent to entire summer in Bedminster, N.J." (CBS News, May 5, 2017); "Trump busting presidential norms with weekend getaways" (Politico, May 5, 2107)

 

Credits: Original music on this episode was composed and performed by Alanna Leavy. The clip of “Mentira” was by French-born Spanish singer Manu Chao on his album, Clandestino, which features songs he wrote while traveling through South America. The clip of “Please Release Me, Let Me Gogo” was by the Belgian-based Neon Judgement. Matthew Starley read the chapter titles. Santa Barbara Tax March protestors included Venice and Asher, Bernadette, Linda, Karen, Jennifer, and others. Speakers were Maricela Morales of CAUSE, Sean Tucker, and Santa Barbara City Councilwoman Cathy Murillo. “Please Release Me, Part II” was compiled and produced by Holly Starley. The episode was recorded, in part, in KJUC, KCSB’s AM studio. Thank you to everyone everywhere who stands up against injustice and oppression.

Episode 2. Please Release Me, Part I

Are they like me? On April 15, 2017, communities across the globe marched to demand the release of US president Donald Trump's taxes and protest the emergent blatancy of the "ruling wealthy's" policymaking in terms of who it does and does not favor. Across Venezuela throughout April and May 2017, demonstrators have protested Venezuelan president Nicolás Maduro's widening arc of power and the country's plummeting, dire socioeconomic situation. With voices from the Tax March in Santa Barbara, California, including that of Maricela Morales, executive director of CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy), this episode looks at the functionality of that question: Am I like them? What role does it play for demonstrators? Responders? Observers? Decision makers?

"Truly powerful people are not concerned about their power, but about being in a position to empower."

—Nadja Swarovski

Credits: Music on this episode was composed and performed by Alanna Leavy. Voices from the Tax March in Santa Barbara, California, include protestors; the crowd; and Maricela Morales, executive director of CAUSE. The excerpt from "On Nonviolent Resistance" by Mohandas Gandhi was ready by Diana La Riva. Matthew Starley read the chapter titles. The episode was created in part in KJUC, the AM studio of KCSB. Production work was done by Colin L. and host, Holly Starley.

Links and extras from episode 3. Please Release Me, Part I

Tax March

CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy)

On the Venezuelan protestsPhotos from NPR, "Venezuelan Opposition Aims to Keep Protests Peaceful, but Violence Erupts" (New York Times, April 24, 2017), "Venezuela Protest Death Toll Rises in Renewed Violence" (BBC News, April 25, 2017), "Roses in Hand, Venezuelan Woman Protestors Face Security Forces," (Reuters, May 6, 2017), "Why Is Venezuela in Crisis Again?" (an analysis by Al-Jazeera, April 22, 2017)  

♪ JahlfaOmega of Caracas, Venezuela - musica como "medicina social" seeking "un mundo de armonía y felicidad, donde prevalezcan valores como la justicia, la unidad, la empatía y principalmente el amor. Listen to "Hijos de Jah." Watch this interview, "Fe Viviente Rastafari."

 

Hidden Brain, a podcast that explores "life's unseen patterns." Host Shankar Vedantam talks about his conversation with psychologist/sociologist Robb Willer and the psychology of protest movements.

On the complicated taxes of the United States: "Policy Basics: Federal Tax Expenditures" (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities); Danielle Kurtzleben explores what people in the US don't know about taxes in "We Asked…" (heard on All Things Considered, April 17, 2017); Connie Ballmer, the wife of former Microsoft CEO and current LA Clippers owner, Steve Ballmer, challenged his notion that "tax money should create a sufficient social safety net," so he's seeking to "figure out what the government really does with the money" (New York Times, April 17, 2017);  an oldie but a goodie, "Thanks for paying taxes. Here's a Receipt." (NPR, Sept. 30, 2010) 

Episode 1. Farewell to the Big S

Why story? Stories slow us down; minimize risk; connect us; help us feel less lonely or "abnormal"; bring light to shadowed places; make science accessible; help decision makers feel the real effects of their choices; and capture the truths of diverse experiences, solutions, struggles, and joys.

Guest: Screenwriter, singer, actress, storyteller Mariangélica Duque on storytelling; her move from Bogotá, Colombia, to Santa Barbara, California; and creating story in a new place.  

Links from episode 1

Sing it Out, the teens of AHA and Mariangélica Duque at the Lobero on April 30

Anima, Theatre of the Feminine Underground at Center Stage on May 31

Two truths for the Crimean border depending on where you're located

The Heart podcast (Note: not necessarily for sensitive listeners or kiddos)

Amigos Para Siempre - la música de Oki Doki

And one more from Oki Doki - Paren No Desparen

 

Credits: Music on this episode composed and performed by Alanna Leavy and Matthew Starley. A cappella musical guest, Mariangélica Dunque. Creative guidance by Colin L. Created in part in KJUC, the AM studio of KCSB. Produced by Holly Starley.